Tag Archive for archaeology

Ancient Fortresses of the Ohio Valley, Part V: Processed Goods, Packaging and Transportation

Ancient Fortresses of the Ohio Valley, Part V: Processed Goods, Packaging and Transportation

By
 Rick Osmon
Originally published in Ancient American Magazine Issue # 105

When we think of ancient trade by ancient merchants, we usually think in terms of durable goods, that is, things or materials that have survived rot and decay to the present day. We think mostly of those things because it’s what we can see or touch. It’s not just earthworks, stone, shells, bone, metal, ceramics, or fabric, either. Pollens, foodstuff remains, wood, seeds, insect remains, domesticated plant and animal remains, paint, language, and the big one, DNA, drive our thoughts and are all are tools we can use to reconstruct some of the goings on of long ago merchants. Some of that trade was from farther afield and much more rapid in transit than most people ever dreamed. Read more

Saving Artifacts from Confirmation Bias

 

Saving Artifacts from Confirmation Bias

Kelly H. Gross

 

When I started as a consultant to manage the development of a project called The Hidden Codex, I expected that the science and antiquities community would be excited over the prospect of discovering a new genuine cultural artifact. Boy was I wrong. The experts had something else entirely in store for me.

I had just begun to experience what I have now come to know as confirmation bias. Confirmation bias is the tendency to notice only that which confirms one’s beliefs and to discount contradictory information.

Our artifact, called a codex, had been lying around on museum shelves, largely forgotten until the early eighties when carbon date testing became widely available. The owners, a group of investors in Ohio, submitted some cloth samples for analysis with surprising results. These tests showed that the codex was over 300 years old, created between 1660 and 1710 in Mexico.

codex folio 2

 

 

 

 

 

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Cast in Bronze

 

Re-Posted From Oopa Loopa Cafe, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 08, 2006

Rick Osmon

Cast in Bronze

I’ve been reading (trying to read between income-based interruptions) my autographed copy — thank you, Fred — of Fred Rydholm’s Michigan Copper, The Untold Story, A History of Discovery.
michcoppercover
Fred makes the case that some ancient people mined many millions of tons of copper from Upper Michigan and from Isle Royale. Note that I didn’t say he poses the argument. No, Fred makes the case, quite definitively, I think. Most archeologists and historians completely discount or ignore the notion that there “was more copper used just to build the Great Pyramid than could be found in all the old world”. But just how many copper chisels were turned to dust shaping over two million granite blocks? My guess is about two million.As with anything, it boils down to: who, when, where, why  Read more

Ancient Asiatic Writing in North America

ANCIENT ASIATIC WRITING IN NORTH AMERICA

By, Dr John Ruskamp

For centuries, researchers have been debating if, in pre-Columbian times, meaningful exchanges between the indigenous peoples of Asia and the Americas ever occurred. Periodically, over the past 250 years knowledgeable sinologists and oceanographers have written positively on this topic, yet, so far, no conclusive proof has been put forth establishing such trans-Pacific contact as a historical event.

Now in a published research manuscript Dr. John Ruskamp provides previously unrecognized and compelling new epigraphic evidence, in the form of ancient North American Chinese rock writings that he has identified interspersed among otherwise Native American petroglyphs and pictographs, establishing that in pre-Columbian times literate Asians did indeed traverse the Pacific Ocean to North America, shortly after 1150 BC. Read more

Geoglyphology, An Ancient Science Rediscovered

Geoglyphology, An Ancient Science Rediscovered

 

Arthur D. Faram
Faram Research Foundation – Arlington, Texas

Recently Arthur Faram, while investigating his Celtic Genealogy, discovered an ancient and historically revealing science.

After determining that this science had not been mentioned in any previous publications, The Faram Research Foundation named the ancient science Geoglyphology. “Geo” for earth, “glyph” for writing and “ology “ for the study of… . The original function of Geoglyphology, by the ancients, was to mark and claim territories. Since its rediscovery, this ancient science has been used to expand both the search area and the knowledge base available to the Archeologist and related disciplines. In addition, since the science was primarily used to mark large territories, claimed by the originator of the geoglyph, the resultant findings are rewriting history. Read more

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IMG_1086[1]This web site is dedicated to investigating mysteries of history and archaeology, some that arose long before Christopher Columbus sailed west, some that are more recent. A few are current. There are articles by both amateurs and professionals, seasoned researchers and beginners, great writers, and people who simply have something to say. All of them get a voice here. (See contributors’ guide)

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