Events

Events:

 

11th Annual Conference on Ancient America is Oct. 9-11, 2015 at the Island Resort, Casino & Convention Center, Hannahville/Harris MI, 14 miles W of Escanaba on US-2.

http://www.aaapf.org/scripts/openExtra.asp?extra=1

 

 

Below Information is Courtesy of Rock Art @ ASU group:

(1) Upcoming Presentations, Classes, Tours, and Other Activities (June 27-28 “Homolovi State Park, Rock Art Ranch, and the Multi-Kiva Site Cultural Heritage Tour” reservation deadline is June 18)

(2) Old Pueblo Archaeology Center’s youth education programs

(3) Our Mission and Support

(4) Our Announcements and Opt-Out Options

 

 

(1) UPCOMING PRESENTATIONS, CLASSES, TOURS, AND OTHER ACTIVITIES

 

Note that some activities listed here are sponsored by organizations other than Old Pueblo Archaeology Center, and that some have deadlines for preregistration.

 

*   One asterisk indicates that this is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center-sponsored program and that another organization must be contacted to register or to obtain more information.

 

** Two asterisks indicates that the activity is sponsored by the Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary (PGMA) but that Old Pueblo Archaeology Center members can attend at the PGMA‘s member-discount rates.

 

**** Four asterisks is a prompt for more information or to indicate that Old Pueblo is missing some information.

 

 

LOOKING AHEAD: Saturday October 31, 2015

            Deadline to purchase tickets for the “Raffle of a 2015 Ford Mustang 50th Anniversary Edition” by Tucson’s Jim Click Automotive Team to benefit Old Pueblo Archaeology Center & other Tucson charities and for the “Old Pueblo – Young People” fundraising raffle, both to be held on November 13. See announcements for both events below.

 

Wednesday, June 3, 2014: Phoenix

“Harvest of the Desert” free presentation by David Morris, sponsored by the nonprofit Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary (PGMA) at Pueblo Grande Museum and Archaeological Park, 4619 E. Washington St., Phoenix**

7:30 to 9 p.m. Free

Native American naturalist David Morris will discuss and illustrate the many uses of the Sonoran Desert’s plants and the biology that makes them useful. Some plants have provided for the people of the desert since prehistoric times. See how plants were used for food, building, medicine and magic by examining the ethnobotany of the Sonoran Desert. Mr. Morris, a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, has been a central Arizona resident for over 40 years. Originally from the Kansas-Oklahoma area, he received a degree in plant science from Northern Arizona University and currently is a museum aide for the Pueblo Grande Museum in Phoenix. He also participates in many area Indian art markets with his modern recreations of rock art and hand painted gourds.

** This is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center-sponsored event. No reservations are needed. For more information contact the Pueblo Grande Museum at 602-495-0901 or Don Appel at dappelpgma@cox.net.

 

 

Monday June 15, 2015: Tucson

“Cochise Culture Re-revisited: 2014–2015 Excavations at Desperation Ranch” free presentation by Jesse A. M. Ballenger, Jonathan Mabry, and others at Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society meeting, Banner University Medical Center Room 5403 (not in usual DuVal Auditorium venue), 1501 N. Campbell Ave., Tucson*

7:30-9 p.m. Free

Recently completed excavations at southeastern Arizona’s Cave Creek Midden site discovered a thick layer of cobblestones, bones, and flaked and ground stone tools buried in and below a dark, organic cienega soil. This talk reviews why Cave Creek Midden is important, what archaeologists expected to find there before the recent excavations, how they went about finding it, what they actually found, and what the finds may or may not mean. They will discuss the importance of the Chiricahua stage and early maize cultivation in the Southwest, the significance of the site in Arizona and archaeological history, subsistence of desert hunter-gatherers and agriculturalists, prehistory of big-game hunting in the Southwest, basic principles of bison hunting, stratigraphy and radiocarbon dates at the site, attempts to prove that animals discovered there include a newly recognized Chihuahuan Desert subspecies, community archaeology, fire safety, serendipity, and the long-term preservation of the site.

* This is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center-sponsored event. No reservations needed. For details visit www.az-arch-and-hist.org or contact John D. Hall at Tucson telephone 520-205-2553 orjhall@sricrm.com.

 

 

Monday-Friday June 15-19, 2015: Phoenix
Center for Archaeology and Society’s “Archaeology and Desert Ecology Summer Camp” at Deer Valley Petroglyph Preserve (DVPP), 3711 W. Deer Valley Rd., Phoenix*
8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. daily; $140 DVPP members; $180 nonmembers

The Center for Archaeology and Society and The Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability present a summer camp for children ages 8-12 at the Deer Valley Petroglyph Preserve; a 47-acre archaeological site and desert nature preserve. Topics include archaeology and anthropology, desert ecology, and environmental sustainability in the desert. Includes hands-on educational activities, archaeological fieldwork and demonstrations, art and science projects, nature hikes, and cultural experiences. Each session limited to 20 students. Limited scholarships are available.

* This is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center event. Registration required by June 10. Register online at shesc.asu.edu/dvpp. For more information contact Libby Gerold at 623-582-8007 orelizabeth_gerold@asu.edu.

 

 

Friday June 19, 2015: Tucson

“Southwestern Rock Calendars and Ancient Time Pieces” free presentation by archaeologist Allen Dart for Pima County Public Library at the Woods Memorial Branch, 3455 N. First Ave., Tucson*

3-4 p.m. Free

Native Americans in the Southwest developed sophisticated skills in astronomy and predicting the seasons, centuries before Old World peoples first entered the region. In this presentation archaeologist Allen Dart discusses the petroglyphs at Picture Rocks, the architecture of the “Great House” at Arizona’s Casa Grande Ruins, and other archaeological evidence of ancient southwestern astronomy and calendrical reckoning; and interprets how these discoveries may have related to ancient Native American rituals.

* This is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center event. For more information contact Kelly Urman in Tucson at 520-594-5445 or Kelly.Urman@pima.gov; for information about the presentation subject matter contact Allen Dart at Tucson telephone 520-798-1201 or adart@oldpueblo.org.

 

 

Saturday & Sunday June 27 & 28, 2015: Near Winslow, AZ

Old Pueblo Archaeology Center’s “Homolovi State Park, Rock Art Ranch, and the Multi-Kiva Site Cultural Heritage Tour” with archaeologist Rich Lange starting at Homolovi State Park Visitor Center(northeast of Winslow – take I-40 Exit 257 and drive 1.5 miles north on Hwy. 87)

1 p.m. Saturday-1 p.m. or later Sunday; $60 per person ($50 for Old Pueblo Archaeology Center and Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary members) includes all site entry fees but no transportation, lodging, or meals

Archaeologist Rich Lange will lead this tour to sites where archaeologist Chuck Adams and Rich are currently excavating and have excavated nearly every summer during the Arizona State Museum’s Homol’ovi Research Program since the mid 1980s. This will be an opportunity to visit two of the large ancestral Hopi villages just outside of Winslow that date to the AD 1300s. We also will visit the spectacular rock art panels at Rock Art Ranch in Chevelon Canyon, and the Multi-Kiva site, where excavations being done this summer will just about be wrapping up. If traveling from Tucson, plan on a minimum of 5½ hrs driving, depending on general traffic conditions and how many pit stops you make.

Reservations and payment required by 5 p.m. Thursday June 18: 520-798-1201 or info@oldpueblo.org.

**** IF YOU WOULD LIKE US TO EMAIL YOU A FLYER with color photos about the above-listed activity please reply with “Send flyer” and INCLUDE THE EVENT’S DATE in your email subject line.

 

 

Thursday July 2, 2015: Prescott, AZ

“Southwestern Rock Calendars and Ancient Time Pieces” free presentation by archaeologist Allen Dart for Arizona Humanities Lecture Series at Prescott Public Library, 215 E. Goodwin Street, Prescott, Arizona *

5-6 p.m. Free

Native Americans in the Southwest developed sophisticated skills in astronomy and predicting the seasons, centuries before Old World peoples first entered the region. In this presentation archaeologist Allen Dart discusses the petroglyphs at Picture Rocks, the architecture of the “Great House” at Arizona’s Casa Grande Ruins, and other archaeological evidence of ancient southwestern astronomy and calendrical reckoning; and interprets how these discoveries may have related to ancient Native American rituals.

* This is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center event. For more information contact Normalene Zeeman in Prescott at 928-777-1509 or normalene.zeeman@prescott-az.gov; for information about the presentation subject matter contact Allen Dart at Tucson telephone 520-798-1201 or adart@oldpueblo.org.

 

 

Monday July 20, 2015: Tucson

“Irrigation, Social Changes, and Ecological Knowledge in Early Farming Societies in the Sonoran Desert” free presentation by Dr. Jonathan Mabry at Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society meeting, Banner University Medical Center DuVal Auditorium, 1501 N. Campbell Ave., Tucson*

7:30-9 p.m. Free

****Description coming.

* This is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center-sponsored event. No reservations needed. For details visit www.az-arch-and-hist.org or contact John D. Hall at Tucson telephone 520-205-2553 orjhall@sricrm.com.

 

 

Thursday-Sunday August 6-9, 2015: Colorado

“Pecos Archaeological Conference” at the Lost Canyon Ranch approximately 9 miles north of Mancos Colorado.*

The Pecos Conference is an annual conference that has been held nearly every year since 1927 under open skies in the southwestern United States or northwestern Mexico, for people interested in the latest southwestern U.S. archaeological research (including archaeologists). Under a large, open tent, they spend three or more days together discussing recent research, the problems of the field, and challenges of the archaeological profession. In recent years, Native Americans, avocational archaeologists, the general public and media organizations have participated. and come to speak with the archaeologists. These individuals and groups play an increasingly important role, as participants and as audience, helping professional archaeologists celebrate archaeological research and to mark cultural continuity. Open to all, the Pecos Conference remains an important and superlative opportunity to meet with professional archaeologists on a one-on-one informal basis to learn about the profession, gain access to resources and new research opportunities, and to test new methods and theories related to archaeology.

* This is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center event. For more information visit https://www.facebook.com/pages/Pecos-Conference/203021673045677 or email pecos.conference@gmail.com.

 

 

Monday September 21, 2015: Tucson

“The Archaeology of the Human Experience” free presentation by archaeologist Michelle Hegmon at Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society meeting, Banner University Medical Center DuVal Auditorium, 1501 N. Campbell Ave., Tucson*

7:30-9 p.m. Free

****Description coming.

* This is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center-sponsored event. No reservations needed. For details visit www.az-arch-and-hist.org or contact John D. Hall at Tucson telephone 520-205-2553 orjhall@sricrm.com.

 

 

Wednesday September 23, 2015: Tucson-Marana

Old Pueblo Archaeology Center’s “Autumnal Equinox Tour of Los Morteros and Picture Rocks Petroglyphs Archaeological Sites” with archaeologist Allen Dart, departing from northeast corner of Silverbell Road & Linda Vista Blvd. in Marana, Arizona

8 a.m. to noon. $20 ($16 for Old Pueblo Archaeology Center and Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary members)

To celebrate the autumnal equinox, archaeologist Allen Dart (Old Pueblo Archaeology Center’s executive director) leads this tour to Los Morteros, an ancient village site that includes a Hohokam ballcourt and bedrock mortars, and to Picture Rocks, where ancient petroglyphs include a solstice and equinox marker, dancing human-like figures, whimsical animals, and other rock symbols made by Hohokam Indians between A.D. 650 and 1450.

LIMITED TO 32 PEOPLE. RESERVATIONS REQUIRED by 5 p.m. Tuesday September 22: 520-798-1201 or info@oldpueblo.org.

**** IF YOU WOULD LIKE US TO EMAIL YOU A FLYER with color photos about the above-listed activity please reply with “Send flyer” and INCLUDE THE EVENT’S DATE in your email subject line.

 

 

Fridays October 2-December 11, 2015 (except Friday Nov. 27): Tucson

“Prehistory of the Southwest Class: The Hohokam Culture of Southern Arizona” with archaeologist Allen Dart at Old Pueblo Archaeology Center, 2201 W. 44th Street (at Tucson Unified School District’s Ajo Service Center, just west of La Cholla Blvd., ½-mile north of John F. Kennedy Park), Tucson

6:30 to 8:30 p.m. each Friday evening October 2 through December 11 (skip Thanksgiving weekend, November 27); fee of $95 ($80 for Old Pueblo Archaeology Center and Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary members) does not include cost of recommended text: The Hohokam Millennium by Paul R. Fish and Suzanne K. Fish, editors; available from Old Pueblo for $24.95 Old Pueblo & PGMA members $19.96) or the cost of AAS membership or AAS Certification Program registration1

Archaeologist Allen Dart teaches this class in ten 2-hour sessions to explore the archaeology of the ancient Hohokam culture of the American Southwest. The class cover Hohokam origins, subsistence and settlement systems, social and organizational systems, material culture including ceramics, other artifacts, and architecture, interaction within and beyond the Hohokam culture’s regional boundaries, and ideas on religion and trade. Each student is expected to prepare a BRIEF research report to be presented orally or in written form. Minimum enrollment 10, maximum 20.

Reservations and payment required by 5 p.m. Tuesday September 29: 520-798-1201 or info@oldpueblo.org.

1 Class meets the requirements of the Arizona Archaeological Society (AAS) Certification Program’s (www.azarchsoc.org/certification.htm) “Advanced Prehistory of the Southwest: Hohokam” class. The AAS basic “Prehistory of the Southwest” class is recommended as a prerequisite but this is negotiable with the instructor.

**** IF YOU WOULD LIKE US TO EMAIL YOU A FLYER with color photos about the above-listed activity please reply with “Send flyer” and INCLUDE THE EVENT’S DATE in your email subject line.

 

 

Saturday October 3, 2015: Tucson

“Arrowhead-making and Flintknapping Workshop” with flintknapper Sam Greenleaf at Old Pueblo Archaeology Center, 2201 W. 44th Street, Tucson (in Tucson Unified School District’s Ajo Service Center, just west of La Cholla Blvd., ½-mile north of John F. Kennedy Park)

9 a.m. to noon. $35 ($28 for Old Pueblo Archaeology Center and Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary members) fee includes all materials and equipment.

Learn how to make arrowheads, spear points, and other flaked stone artifacts just like ancient peoples did. In this workshop, flintknapping expert Sam Greenleaf provides participants with hands-on experience and learning on how prehistoric people made and used projectile points and other tools created from obsidian and other stone. The class is designed to help modern people understand how prehistoric Native Americans made traditional crafts, and is not intended to train students how to make artwork for sale. Minimum enrollment 6, maximum 8.

Reservations required: 520-798-1201 or info@oldpueblo.org.

 

 

Wednesday, October 7, 2015: Waddell-Buckeye, AZ

“Set in Stone but Not in Meaning: Southwestern Indian Rock Art” free presentation by archaeologist Allen Dart featuring bonus photos of petroglyphs in White Tank Mountain Regional Park, at the Maricopa County White Tank Library, 20304 W. White Tank Mountain Rd., Waddell, AZ

1-2:30 p.m. Free

Native Americans in the Southwest developed sophisticated skills in astronomy and predicting the seasons, centuries before Old World peoples first entered the region. In this presentation archaeologist Allen Dart discusses the petroglyphs at Picture Rocks, the architecture of the “Great House” at Arizona’s Casa Grande Ruins, and other archaeological evidence of ancient southwestern astronomy and calendrical reckoning; and interprets how these discoveries may have related to ancient Native American rituals.

For event details contact Patty Dennehy at 602-651-2210 or PattyDennehy@mcldaz.org; for information about the activity subject matter contact Allen Dart at Tucson telephone 520-798-1201 oradart@oldpueblo.org.

 

 

Friday October 9, 2015: Green Valley, AZ

“Hohokam and Mimbres Archaeology, Art, and Ideology” adult education class with archaeologist Allen Dart for OLLI-UA Green Valley members at ****[place TBA], Green Valley, Arizona*

3:30 to 5 p.m. Open only to Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) members; OLLI-UA Green Valley membership fee of $95 for Fall session or $130 for entire year allows one to take this and many other OLLI courses

Comparison of New Mexico’s Classic Mimbres culture (AD 1000-1130) pottery and rock art with the ceramics and rock images of the contemporaneous Hohokam culture of southern Arizona helps define the spheres of those cultures’ art and ideology. Certain icons are common to both Hohokam and Mimbres art, whereas each culture also exhibits repeated motifs that apparently were rarely or never produced by the other. Comparison and contrast of the shared and unshared art images, and of other aspects of Hohokam and Mimbres cultures, suggest similarities as well as differences in their respective religious beliefs and practices.

* This is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center-sponsored event. To join Green Valley OLLI visit https://ce.arizona.edu/olli to download a registration and payment form or pay and register online; for information about this course contact Paula Kulina at 602-317-1488 or garlina@cox.net, or Allen Dart at 520-798-1201 or adart@oldpueblo.org.

 

 

Friday & Saturday October 9 & 10, 2015: El Paso

“19th Biennial Jornada Mogollon Conference” at El Paso Museum of Archaeology, 4301 Transmountain Road, El Paso*

****Times; fees

Archaeologists working in the Jornada Branch of the Mogollon culture area of the American Southwest present their recent research during this conference. Geographically the Jornada Mogollon extends from Carrizozo, New Mexico on the north to just south of Villa Ahumada, Chihuahua, Mexico on the south, and from east of Deming, New Mexico, eastward to the Pecos River.

* This is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center event. For more information contact George Maloof at 915-755-4332 or MaloofGO@elpasotexas.gov.

 

 

Friday-Wednesday October 9-14, 2015: Tucson to California

“Central California Missions Tour” sponsored by Tucson’s Southwestern Mission Research Center (SMRC) departing Tucson to central California*

$1,425 per person includes transportation, lodging (double occupancy), and meals

Join SMRC for a tour of five Spanish Colonial mission churches established in central California by the Franciscan missionaries during the late 1700s and early 1800s. Tour starts from Tucson and first visits the beautiful Mission Santa Barbara and its attached museum, with lunch at the Presidio in Santa Barbara. The following day we visit Mission La Purisima and Mission Santa Inés, and during early evening the gardens of Mission San Luis Obispo. The next morning we will depart for Mission San Miguel. From San Miguel, we will visit and spend the night at the friary in the very special Mission San Antonio. This is an extremely rare treat to be able to have dinner and spend the night at this mission in individual rooms. There are no double rooms at the friary. We will be treated to breakfast there as well. We will be taking a large passenger bus to California spending our first night in Palm Springs. Our last night will be spent in Riverside at the Mission Inn Hotel, a National Historic Landmark.

* This is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center event. For more information contact Gail Bornfield at 520-797-8825 or gbornfie@comcast.net.

 

 

Monday October 19, 2015: Tucson

“Ancient Woodworking, Animal Use, and Hunting Practices in Southeastern Utah: New Insights from the Study of Early Perishable Collections” free presentation by Chuck LaRue and Laurie Webster at Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society meeting, Banner University Medical Center DuVal Auditorium, 1501 N. Campbell Ave., Tucson*

7:30-9 p.m. Free

****Description coming.

* This is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center-sponsored event. No reservations needed. For details visit www.az-arch-and-hist.org or contact John D. Hall at Tucson telephone 520-205-2553 orjhall@sricrm.com.

 

 

Friday November 13, 2015: Tucson

“Raffle of a 2015 Ford Mustang 50th Anniversary Edition” by Tucson’s Jim Click Automotive Team to benefit Old Pueblo Archaeology Center & other Tucson charities

Tucson’s Jim Click Automotive Team is presenting a new 2015 Ford Mustang, 50th Anniversary Edition, to be used as the featured prize in a raffle to raise millions of dollars for Tucson-area nonprofit organizations. And, to sweeten the raffle, for every Mustang ticket we sell, Old Pueblo Archaeology Center will enter a “Piggyback” ticket for the purchaser into Old Pueblo’s separate November 13 “Old Pueblo – Young People” fundraising raffle drawing for southwestern works of art, described below! With your $25 contribution (or 5 raffle tickets for $100) you could win this collector’s-item 2015 Mustang or one of the Old Pueblo art prizes (or both!). The best part is that 100% of your contribution will support Old Pueblo Archaeology Center, which gets to keep all of the proceeds from our sales of the Mustang raffle tickets.

Your donation to purchase raffle tickets will help Old Pueblo Archaeology Center provide more archaeology and culture education programs for children who would not be able to afford our programs without your help.

A maximum of 100,000 tickets will be distributed for the Mustang raffle. To be entered in both the Mustang and Old Pueblo Piggyback raffles your contributions for tickets must be received (not postmarked) by Old Pueblo by October 31 so that we can turn them in to the Jim Click Automotive Team’s raffle coordinator by November 6. The drawing will be held on November 13.

The rules of the Mustang raffle require that Old Pueblo account for all tickets issued to us and that we return all unsold tickets; therefore, payment in advance is required in order to obtain tickets. The ticket price is $25 apiece or five tickets for $100. Tickets may be purchased by check sent to our PO box address listed below, by calling Allen Dart at 520-603-6181 to provide your Visa, MasterCard, or Discover card payment authorization, or through the PayPal portal on Old Pueblo’s www.oldpueblo.org home page. Once you have provided payment, Old Pueblo will enter your tickets into the drawings for you and will mail you the correspondingly numbered ticket stubs with a letter acknowledging your contribution.

Tickets for the Mustang raffle are 5 for $100 or $25 each. Deadline to purchase tickets from Old Pueblo is Saturday October 31. For tickets or more information contact Old Pueblo at 520-798-1201 orinfo@oldpueblo.org. For more information about the Jim Click Automotive Team’s 2015 Mustang raffle visit www.millionsfortucson.org.

**** IF YOU WOULD LIKE US TO EMAIL YOU A FLYER with color photos about the above-listed activity please reply with “Send flyer” and INCLUDE THE EVENT’S DATE in your email subject line.

 

 

Friday November 13, 2015: Tucson

Win a Navajo Rug or One of Many Other Prizes in the “Old Pueblo – Young People” Fundraising Raffle to benefit Old Pueblo Archaeology Center’s archaeology education programs for children!

The GRAND PRIZE is a red, black, and white, 66″ x 37″ Navajo rug-saddle blanket appraised at up to $800 by two of Tucson’s best-known Indian arts shops.

Proceeds from our raffle make it possible for Old Pueblo to continue offering our children’s archaeology edu­cation programs, which include the OPEN3 simulated archaeological excavation learning program, our OPENOUT in-classroom education programs, and our guided archaeological site tours for kids.

Other prizes to be given away in the raffle include:

– Hand-made pottery seed jar by Kickapoo-Potawatomi artist Pahponee valued at $600

– Tohono O’odham (Papago) closed-stitch basket valued at $200+

–  “Qoia Mana Todazafene” kachina doll valued at $90-$110

– Tarascan Wooden mask, ca.1900, valued at $125

–  “Navajo prayer bundle” fetish

– 4 reproductions of ancient Mexican painted clay faces

– 10 Southwestern prehistoric pottery reproductions

– 17 vintage archaeology-theme T-shirts & 1 sweatshirt

– Two places on an archaeologist-guided tour to Los Morteros Hohokam village & Picture Rocks petroglyphs archaeological sites

Contact Old Pueblo at 520-798-1201 or info@oldpueblo.org for tickets and updated prize information.

**** IF YOU WOULD LIKE US TO EMAIL YOU A FLYER with color photos and details of the “Old Pueblo – Young People” raffle please reply with “Send November 13 OPYP flyer” in your email subject line.

 

 

Monday November 16, 2015: Tucson

“The Earliest Apache in Arizona: Evidence and Arguments” free presentation by archaeologist Deni Seymour at Arizona Archaeological and Historical Society meeting, Banner University Medical Center DuVal Auditorium, 1501 N. Campbell Ave., Tucson*

7:30-9 p.m. Free

Recent research provides evidence of ancestral Apaches in the southern Southwest at least as early as the A.D. 1300s. Some of this evidence comes from chronometric dates obtained from a feature type that comparative ethnographic information (including rarely used land claims documents) indicates were used for storage. These features, called platform caches, provide rare and ideal material for accurate dating because they are often covered with grass or leaves. Dates from these features, on Apache pottery, and from roasting pits, all in direct association with Apache material culture of other types (including rock art), provide a continuous sequence of use from at least as early as the A.D. 1300s through the late 1700s. New information about a western route south to this region is combined with other evidence regarding the presence of the earliest ancestral Apache three centuries earlier than many have argued, even in areas where Coronado did not see them.

* This is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center-sponsored event. No reservations needed. For details visit www.az-arch-and-hist.org or contact John D. Hall at Tucson telephone 520-205-2553 or jhall@sricrm.com.

 

 

Saturday December 5, 2015: Tohono O’odham Reservation, AZ

TOUR IS FULL; WAITING LIST STARTED. “Baboquivari Peak Sacred Cave, Petroglyphs, and Himdag Ki Cultural Center” car-caravan educational tour to sites in and near Topawa, Arizona, with Old Pueblo Archaeology Center executive director Allen Dart, departing from Pima Community College, 401 N. Bonita Ave., Tucson

8 a.m.-5 p.m. $40 ($32 for Old Pueblo Archaeology Center and Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary members; no charge for members or employees of the Tohono O’odham Nation)

In an educational adventure into Native American culture, this tour meets in Tucson at 8 a.m. and travels to the Tohono O’odham (Papago) Indian Reservation for visits to the Tohono O’odham Cultural Center & Museum, the Picture Rock petroglyphs archaeological site, the historic Baboquivari Camp, and a Tohono O’odham traditional sacred cave site. We will visit the Cultural Center in Topawa, Arizona, from 10 a.m. to 11:30, then drive 12 miles east toward Baboquivari Peak (the legendary home of the Tohono O’odham Creator diety I’itoi), stopping for bring-your-own picnic lunch at Baboquivari Camp, a historic Civilian Conservation Corps camp site in the oak woodland just below Baboquivari Peak. After lunch we will take a moderate-difficulty, two-mile-roundtrip, 1,000-foot-elevation-difference hike up a trail that leads halfway up the peak, to visit a cave site traditionally believed to be one of the homes of the diety I’itoi. Finally, we will visit Picture Rock, a small butte that contains petroglyphs and pictographs, bedrock mortars, and ancient artifacts. Modern Tohono O’odham offerings may be present in some of the visited locations. Artifact collecting is not permitted, and photos are not allowed in the cave but are OK outside of it. Registrants may either meet the tour group at 8 a.m. Saturday in Tucson and car-caravan onto the reservation, or may camp in Baboquivari Camp on their own the night before the field trip and meet the tour group at the Cultural Center Saturday morning. Campers must bring their own food and water, as there are no convenience stores or fast food nearby.

Reservations required by Wednesday December 2: 520-798-1201 or info@oldpueblo.org.

**** IF YOU WOULD LIKE US TO EMAIL YOU A FLYER with color photos about the above-listed activity please reply with “Send flyer” and INCLUDE THE EVENT’S DATE in your email subject line.

 

 

January 14-16, 2016: Tucson

“5th Biennial Southwest Symposium” on the theme of “Engaged Archaeology” at the University of Arizona Student Union Memorial Center, 1303 E. University Blvd., Tucson*

            5 p.m. Thursday-5 p.m. Saturday; fees before Dec. 1, 2015: $80 regular attendees, $40 students; after Dec. 1: $100 regular, $50 students

The Southwest Symposium promotes new ideas and directions in the archaeology of the United States Southwest and the Mexican Northwest. The 2016 symposium focuses on Engaged Archaeology, showcasing collaborative and participatory work with descendant groups and local communities, public archaeology, and interdisciplinary work, in spoken and poster sessions. Presentations demonstrate how engaged archaeology results in new understandings of the past and broadens the relevance of archaeology.

* This is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center event. Register at regonline.com/southwestsymposium; for more information contact Sarah Herr at sherr@desert.com.

 

 

Saturday January 16, 2016: Ajo, AZ

“Petroglyphs of the Charlie Bell Well Area” archaeological site tour with Rick and Sandi Martynec in Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge west of Ajo, Arizona, departing from Tucson

**** Time and fee TBA

The Charlie Bell Well locality in the Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge near Ajo, Arizona, includes more than 3,000 petroglyphs, many of which date to the Archaic period (ca. 8000 BC-AD 500). There are also ancient Native American trails, archaeological features, and artifacts in the canyon near the historic well site. The hike for this tour is approximately 1 mile with an elevation change of 400 feet, considered a moderate hike. We will need to carpool after we rendezvous for the tour because we can take no more than six vehicles into the wildlife refuge. Rick is obtaining permission with Cabeza Prieta Refuge for us to access the site. It will be a long day, 7-8 hours, so bring water and lunch. You may want to plan to spend the night in Ajo.

Reservations required by Wednesday January 14: 520-798-1201 or info@oldpueblo.org.

**** IF YOU WOULD LIKE US TO EMAIL YOU A FLYER with color photos about the above-listed activity please reply with “Send flyer” and INCLUDE THE EVENT’S DATE in your email subject line.

 

 

Wednesday January 20, 2016: Phoenix

“Ancient Southwestern Native American Pottery” free presentation by archaeologist Allen Dart for Heard Museum Guild’s “history of pottery” series at the Heard Museum’s Steele Auditorium, 2301 N. Central Ave., Phoenix*

10-11 a.m. Free

Archaeologist Allen Dart shows Native American ceramic styles that characterized specific eras in the U.S. Southwest prior to about 1300, and discusses how archaeologists use pottery for dating archaeological sites and interpreting ancient lifeways. He discusses the importance of context in archaeology, how the things people make change in style over time, and how different styles are useful for identifying different cultures and for dating archaeological sites. His many illustrations include examples of ancient pottery types made throughout the American Southwest from about 2000 to 700 years ago, as a prelude to the Heard’s January 28 and February 4 presentations about post-1300 Acoma, Hopi, and other Southwestern pottery types.

* This is not an Old Pueblo Archaeology Center event. For more information contact David Rothberg at 602-750-3248 (C), 602-224-9674 (H), or dwesthawk@gmail.com.

 

 

Saturday February 20, 2016: Tohono O’odham Nation, AZ

“Rock Art and Archaeology of Ventana Cave” Old Pueblo Archaeology Center car-caravan educational tour with archaeologist Allen Dart departing from Pima Community College, 401 N. Bonita Ave., Tucson

6 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fee $40 ($32 for Old Pueblo Archaeology Center and Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary members; no charge for members or employees of the Tohono O’odham Nation)

Old Pueblo Archaeology Center offers this early-morning car-caravan tour onto the Tohono O’odham Nation to visit the Ventana Cave National Historic Landmark site. During the Arizona State Museum’s 1940s excavations in the cave, led by archaeologists Emil W. Haury and Julian Hayden, evidence was found for human occupation going back from historic times to around 10,000 years ago. The cave, which actually is a very large rockshelter, also contains pictographs, petroglyphs, and other archaeological features used by Native Americans for thousands of years. Tour leaves Tucson at 6 a.m. to ensure the pictographs can be seen in the best morning light. Fees will benefit the Tohono O’odham Hickiwan District’s efforts to develop a caretaker-interpretive center at Ventana Cave, and the nonprofit Old Pueblo Archaeology Center’s education programs.

Reservations required by Wednesday January 29: 520-798-1201 or info@oldpueblo.org.

**** IF YOU WOULD LIKE US TO EMAIL YOU A FLYER with color photos about the above-listed activity please reply with “Send flyer” and INCLUDE THE EVENT’S DATE in your email subject line.

 

 

(2) OLD PUEBLO ARCHAEOLOGY CENTER’S YOUTH EDUCATION PROGRAMS

 

Reservations are taken continually for school classes and other children’s groups take advantage of Old Pueblo Archaeology Center’s OPEN3 simulated archaeological excavation, OPENOUT archaeology outreach presentations, and archaeological site-touring children’s education programs.

 

The OPEN3 Simulated Archaeological Excavation Education Program

 

The Old Pueblo Educational Neighbor­hood (OPEN) program allows students and adults to learn what archaeology is all about by excavation in “OPEN3,” a full-scale model of an archaeological site. OPEN3 is a simulated excavation site that archaeologists have con­struct­ed to resemble a southern Arizona Hoho­kam Indian ruin. It has full-size replicas of pre­historic pithouses and outdoor features that the Hohokam used for cooking, storage, and other (sometimes surprising) purposes. Students participating in the pro­gram get to learn and practice techniques used to excavate real archaeological sites. They are also exposed to scientific interpret­a­tion of how ancient people constructed their houses, what they looked like, ate, and believed in, and how they created beauty in their lives.

 

OPENOUT Archaeology Outreach Presentations

 

Old Pueblo’s OPEN­­OUT (Old Pueblo Educational Neigh­borhood Outreach) program offers 45-60 minute presenta­tions by pro­fes­sional archaeologists. Each presentation shows kids how some aspects of every­day life have changed while others have stayed the same.

 

– The “Ancient Peo­ple of Arizona” presentation gives children an overview of how the Ancestral Pueb­lo (Anasazi), Mogollon, and Hoho­kam peo­ples lived.

– The “Lifestyle of the Hohokam” program shows children how the ancient Ho­ho­­kam lived.

The “Ancient Peo­ple of Arizona” and “Lifestyle of the Hohokam” presentations both include real and replica artifacts, plus abun­dant illus­trations to help children experience how pre­historic Native Americans of our area lived and to appreciate the arts they created.

      – “What is an Archae­­ologist?” is a program designed to give chil­dren an idea of what archaeologists do, how they do it, and how they learn about people through their work. This presentation includes examples of the tools archaeologists work with, real and replica artifacts, and activities to help children experience how archaeologists interpret the past.

The hands-on materi­als and fun lesson plans in our OPEN­OUT programs bring archaeol­ogy and the past alive for children and are a per­fect prelude for the OPEN3 simulated archaeological excavation program.

 

Tours for Youth

 

Old Pueblo Archaeology Center offers guided tours to real archaeological sites for classrooms and other organized children’s groups. Heritage sites that can be visited in this program include a choice of the Picture Rocks petroglyphs site (visited by the school group shown in the accompanying photo), Los Morteros Hohokam Village, or Vista del Rio Hohokam Village. Each youth tour is a guided visit that does not include archaeological excavation; participants are not allowed to collect artifacts.

 

For details and pricing of our children’s education programs please visit our http://www.oldpueblo.org/programs/educational-programs/childrens-programs/ web page.

 

 

 (3) OUR MISSION AND SUPPORT

 

      Old Pueblo Archaeology Center’s mission is to educate children and adults to understand and appreciate archaeology and other cultures, to foster the preservation of archaeological and historical sites, and to develop a lifelong concern for the importance of nonrenewable resources and traditional cultures.

      If you are a member of Old Pueblo, THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT! If your membership has lapsed, we would be grateful if you would rejoin us so that you can again receive membership benefits. Old Pueblo members receive substantial discounts on most of our tours and other activities for which both Old Pueblo and the Pueblo Grande Museum Auxiliary charge fees. You can renew your membership by going to this Old Pueblo Archaeology Center web page:

http://www.oldpueblo.org/about-us/membership/

If you then scroll down to the bottom of that page, you can simply follow the instructions for using our secure online membership form or our printable Enrollment/Subscription form.

Donations by check can be made payable to “OPAC” and mailed to Old Pueblo Archaeology Center, PO Box 40577, Tucson AZ 85717-0577. You can also donate using a major credit or debit card by clicking on “Donation Form” at Old Pueblo’s secure donations web page:

http://www.oldpueblo.org/about-us/donations/

All of us at Old Pueblo Archaeology Center appreciate your support! I hope you enjoy reading this and future issues of the Old Pueblo Archaeology bulletin!

 

 

Regards,

Allen Dart, RPA, Executive Director (Volunteer)
Old Pueblo Archaeology Center
PO Box 40577
Tucson AZ 85717-0577 USA
(520) 798-1201 office, (520) 798-1966 fax
Email: adart@oldpueblo.org
URL: www.oldpueblo.org

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Disclosure: Old Pueblo Archaeology Center’s Executive Director Allen Dart volunteers his time to Old Pueblo. Mr. Dart works full-time as a cultural resources specialist for the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service in Arizona. Views expressed in communications from Old Pueblo Archaeology Center do not necessarily represent views of the U.S. Department of Agriculture or of the United States.

 

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