Archive for West Mexico

The Tucson Artifacts A Photography Album with Transcriptions and Translations of the Medieval Latin

Dear Colleague,

Rob Hyde and I have published our “study volume” of the Tucson Artifacts. This collection of plates, texts and translations brings to general scholarly notice solid archeological and literary proof of Old World influences and settlements in pre-Columbian America. It is available to preview or order only by special invitation and by going to this link:

http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/invited/6222986/b4f2f379b5509e2bacdd5cc6c22f8eb4d878a5f9

You can purchase a softcover print edition of the book from Blurb for $18.75 or pdf download for $9.99. In the meantime.

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Here is the preface from the Blurb study edition so you can read about the background of this publication:

 

Preface

Now that nearly a hundred years have passed since the so-called Tucson Crosses or Silverbell Artifacts were excavated in the compacted soil of the Santa Cruz river valley outside Tucson, Arizona in the years between 1924 and 1930, it seems appro­priate to tell the real story of their meaning for Southwest archeology and indeed world history. There are thirty-five cast lead artifacts, counting double crosses as two and pieces of swords or spears that join to form one. Only one is not lead, the Theodore memorial shaped from native caliche that constitutes artifact no. 2.

All form part of the 1994 bequest to the Arizona Historical Society Museum, South­ern Division by Thomas W. Bent, Jr., where they are split between display cases in the lobby and the vault.

The crosses and related objects, including two nehushtans, were made by the lost-wax process from lead, a favored medium for lasting memorials in antiquity and valuable by-product from the gold-silver-and-copper mining carried on by various foreign visitors in Arizona. They are covered with medieval Latin and square He­brew inscriptions that provide a record of a military colony of Roman, Frankish and British Jews who conquered the Toltec fortress city of Rhoda we now know as Tu­mamoc Hill overlooking Tucson, an ancient and important trading and mining site among the Hohokam Indians. The founders called their new realm Calalus (“Waste­land” in Hebrew) and it lasted from 780 until 900, when it was destroyed by earth­quakes, and the king returned with a large part of his followers to Mexico. At this crossroads of civilizations in ninth century West Mexico we also detect Chinese seal script, Hindu cult objects, Mesoamerican glyphs, images of Jewish and Christian temples, Celtic ogam inscriptions and what might be called “pre-Templar” symbols.

On March 11-14, 2015, with the assistance of Laraine Daly Jones and Doreen Crowe, we were able to take formal studio shots of the entire accession catalogued as 94.26.1AB-32. A record of that photo session is compiled in this private publication with the hope that such a collection of plates paired with matching inventory notes will aide us in preparation of a scholarly monograph on the Calalus Artifacts, as well as be of possible use to the owner institution, people of Arizona and public at large.

Robert C. Hyde and Donald N. Yates

March 1, 2016
Rob and I are now engaged in the following three-volume project.

Forthcoming from Panther’s Lodge Publishers:

Forbidden History:  A Jewish Kingdom in Toltec Mexico, 780-900

Vol. 1:  The Latin Texts

Vol. 2:  Analysis and Interpretation

Vol. 3:  Appendices, Bibliography and Index

By Robert C. Hyde and Donald N. Yates

Published by Panther’s Lodge Publishers

2016

We look forward to hearing any feedback from you and encourage you to pass this email on to interested persons.

Best regards,

Donald N. Yates, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator
DNA Consultants
P.O. Box 2477
Longmont, CO 80502

tel. 480 292-9820
www.dnaconsultants.com
dpy@dnaconsultants.com

East Africans & Ancient Navigation

EAST AFRICANS & ANCIENT NAVIGATION

 

by Harry Bourne

bsooty1@aol.com

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Why It Could Not Be

In a series of papers, this writer has proposed that our ancestors were very much more in touch by sea than is usually accepted by most maritime historians. Doubts about this lead us into something seen in many other of those other papers, namely opening with the negatives and this is echoed in this article with “Why it Could Not Be” are expressed. To also be borne in mind is that dates are to be expressed here as Before Common Era (= BCE/BC) and later ones as Common Era (= CE/AD), as are the international comparisons.

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