Archive for Toltec

The Tucson Artifacts A Photography Album with Transcriptions and Translations of the Medieval Latin

Dear Colleague,

Rob Hyde and I have published our “study volume” of the Tucson Artifacts. This collection of plates, texts and translations brings to general scholarly notice solid archeological and literary proof of Old World influences and settlements in pre-Columbian America. It is available to preview or order only by special invitation and by going to this link:

http://www.blurb.com/bookstore/invited/6222986/b4f2f379b5509e2bacdd5cc6c22f8eb4d878a5f9

You can purchase a softcover print edition of the book from Blurb for $18.75 or pdf download for $9.99. In the meantime.

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Here is the preface from the Blurb study edition so you can read about the background of this publication:

 

Preface

Now that nearly a hundred years have passed since the so-called Tucson Crosses or Silverbell Artifacts were excavated in the compacted soil of the Santa Cruz river valley outside Tucson, Arizona in the years between 1924 and 1930, it seems appro­priate to tell the real story of their meaning for Southwest archeology and indeed world history. There are thirty-five cast lead artifacts, counting double crosses as two and pieces of swords or spears that join to form one. Only one is not lead, the Theodore memorial shaped from native caliche that constitutes artifact no. 2.

All form part of the 1994 bequest to the Arizona Historical Society Museum, South­ern Division by Thomas W. Bent, Jr., where they are split between display cases in the lobby and the vault.

The crosses and related objects, including two nehushtans, were made by the lost-wax process from lead, a favored medium for lasting memorials in antiquity and valuable by-product from the gold-silver-and-copper mining carried on by various foreign visitors in Arizona. They are covered with medieval Latin and square He­brew inscriptions that provide a record of a military colony of Roman, Frankish and British Jews who conquered the Toltec fortress city of Rhoda we now know as Tu­mamoc Hill overlooking Tucson, an ancient and important trading and mining site among the Hohokam Indians. The founders called their new realm Calalus (“Waste­land” in Hebrew) and it lasted from 780 until 900, when it was destroyed by earth­quakes, and the king returned with a large part of his followers to Mexico. At this crossroads of civilizations in ninth century West Mexico we also detect Chinese seal script, Hindu cult objects, Mesoamerican glyphs, images of Jewish and Christian temples, Celtic ogam inscriptions and what might be called “pre-Templar” symbols.

On March 11-14, 2015, with the assistance of Laraine Daly Jones and Doreen Crowe, we were able to take formal studio shots of the entire accession catalogued as 94.26.1AB-32. A record of that photo session is compiled in this private publication with the hope that such a collection of plates paired with matching inventory notes will aide us in preparation of a scholarly monograph on the Calalus Artifacts, as well as be of possible use to the owner institution, people of Arizona and public at large.

Robert C. Hyde and Donald N. Yates

March 1, 2016
Rob and I are now engaged in the following three-volume project.

Forthcoming from Panther’s Lodge Publishers:

Forbidden History:  A Jewish Kingdom in Toltec Mexico, 780-900

Vol. 1:  The Latin Texts

Vol. 2:  Analysis and Interpretation

Vol. 3:  Appendices, Bibliography and Index

By Robert C. Hyde and Donald N. Yates

Published by Panther’s Lodge Publishers

2016

We look forward to hearing any feedback from you and encourage you to pass this email on to interested persons.

Best regards,

Donald N. Yates, Ph.D.
Principal Investigator
DNA Consultants
P.O. Box 2477
Longmont, CO 80502

tel. 480 292-9820
www.dnaconsultants.com
dpy@dnaconsultants.com

The Hopis’ Elder White Brother

Expanded Chapter from Yates’ Old Souls in a New World

© Donald N. Yates 2005-2015

 

Old Souls in a New World, by Donald N. Yates

Published September 2013 by Panther’s Lodge

Cherokee Chapbooks #7

104 pp.

 

What if the history of America’s largest Indian nation is actually a polite modern fiction, one invented by “anthropologists and other friends”? In this sweeping revisionist study of the Cherokee Indians, a scholar trained in classical philology and the new science of genetics discloses the inside story of his tribe. Combining evidence from historical records, esoteric sources like the Keetoowah and Shalokee Warrior Society, archeology, linguistics, religion, myth, sports and music, and DNA, this first new take on the subject in a hundred years guides the reader, ever so surely, into the secret annals of the Eshelokee, whose true name and origins have remained hidden until now. The narrative starts in the third century BCE and concludes with the Cherokees’ removal to Indian Territory in the nineteenth century, when all standard histories just begin. The ancient Egyptians, Greeks, Jews, Romans and Phoenicians have long departed from the world stage. The Cherokee remain after more than two thousand years and are their heirs.

 

About the Author

Donald N. Yates was born in Cedartown, Georgia. He attended Stetson University, University of Vienna, University of Freiburg, Duke University and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he earned a Ph.D. in classical studies with a concentration on Medieval Latin Studies. His books include The Bear Went over the Mountain, Los Lunas Decalogue Stone and Old World Roots of the Cherokee. With Elizabeth C. Hirschman, he authored The Early Jews and Muslims of England and Wales:  A Genetic and Genealogical History. He lives in Colorado.

“The Hopis’ Elder White Brother” (chapter from Old Souls in a New World, by Donald N. Yates, Panther’s Lodge Publishers, 2013)

 

Summary

Ever since publication of The Book of the Hopi in the 1960s the legends of the Hopi Indians of Arizona have been central to any discussion of diffusionism and the origins of North American Indians. In this, the first chapter of a new book about Greek, Egyptian and other Mediterranean cultural traits in the Cherokee Indians, it is suggested that the nucleus of the tribe we now know as the Hopi can be traced to Egypt, that the Hopi worldview contains elements of Hellenistic science and philosophy and that many of the religious terms used in their ceremonies are based on the ancient Egyptian language. The Hopis and the Cherokee, in other words, are related and share roots in the Old World of classical antiquity.

 

1 THE HOPIS’ ELDER WHITE BROTHER

 

History is nothing but the soul’s old wardrobe.

Heinrich Heine

 

“All the lights in the House of the High Priests of American Anthropology are out; all the doors and windows are shut and securely fastened (they do not sleep with their windows open for fear that a new idea might fly in); we have rung the bell of Reason, we have banged on the door with Logic, we have thrown the gravel of Evidence against their windows; but the only sign of life in the house is an occasional snore of Dogma. We are very much afraid that no one is going to come down and let us into the warm, musty halls where the venerable old ideas are nailed to the walls.”

These biting words were penned by Harold Sterling Gladwin in Men out of Asia, the famous archeologist’s most popular non-technical work. Published in 1947, Gladwin’s book presented a maverick view of the peopling of the Americas, identifying five migrations of diverse races including Negrittoes and Austronesians to the New World. Heretically, he placed the first migration as early as 25,000 years ago and argued that the earliest colonists were Australoid.

The reaction of his colleagues in the anthropological establishment was stony silence, tinged with harumphs and pshaws of injured pride. Gladwin illustrated Men out of Asia with droll cartoons by Campbell Grant making fun of the sacred keepers of knowledge at the Peabody Museum at Harvard, Carnegie Foundation and Smithsonian Institution. In one, the dean of Southwest and Maya archeology Alfred V. Kidder is depicted as Dr. Phuddy Duddy sitting in academic robes atop a factory whistle sounding the alarm of illogical chronology. In another, a bespectacled Gladwin and his tweedy friend Professor Earnest Hooton of Harvard are shown in the academic doghouse “by request.”

The Establishment is still uncomfortable about Gladwin, who died in 1983 after a distinguished career of more than sixty years. Although willing to praise his meticulous fieldwork on the Hohokam at Snaketown and exacting methodologies developed at the research center he founded at Gila Pueblo outside Globe, Arizona, they do not know quite what to say about his conclusions and hypotheses, which grew more adamant toward the end of his life. The destroying angel of unorthodox theories, Stephen Williams of the Peabody Museum, can only think that Gladwin succumbed to his “whimsies” and grew soft-headed in his old age. “I have always regarded Men Out of Asia,” Williams loftily declares in Fantastic Archeology, “as a sort of spoof.”

Thomas Mills lived for many years on the Hopi Indian Reservation in Northern Arizona, where he and his mother opened and operated the Cultural Center at Second Mesa. A close friend was White Bear, the traditionalist who helped Frank Waters compile The Book of the Hopi in 1963. Mills was on familiar terms with other elders, kiva chiefs and artisans. In 2001, he wrote a little book of his own called The Truth. It was an attempt to reconcile some of the conflicting answers he had received from his sources.

How did a desert-dwelling, isolated people know of the earth’s spherical shape and rotation in space? What was the long journey in boats from across the sea they spoke of? And who were the Ant People they took refuge with after the destruction of the first, second and third worlds? Eventually, Mills felt he had some answers from Egyptian religion. He came to believe that the Hopi were Egyptians, old souls in Native America, charged with the task of praying for the safety of the world. The delicate balance of affairs in human destiny depended on a Hopi prayer feather or paho.

Paho seems to be an Egyptian word (pw). Embedded in Hopi customs and rituals are apparently many traces of ancient Old World civilizations. I thought of a time several years ago when Hopi elders David Mowa and Ronald Wadsworth came to give a talk at the university where I was teaching. I noticed David preferred to sleep on the floor in our guest room instead of the pullout bed. That was quite Indian, of course, but his act of leaving a crust of bread on the piano bench when he departed was not. This practice is rooted in the ancient Greek religious gesture of offering bread and milk to the household gods in a strange home.

Author Hamilton Tyler noted several Greek customs among the Pueblo Indians. The plinth-like figure of Masaw evokes the armless guardian statues or herms used by the Greeks as boundary markers. Hermes is both god of roads and boundaries and conductor of the dead to the underworld. “A number of students of Pueblo religion,” Tyler admitted, “have remarked that it was something like Greek religion.” Yet after uncovering astonishing analogies between the two religions, he concluded that “there is no actual connection between these two gods who lived centuries apart and on different sides of the globe.”

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Review of : BEFORE COLUMBUS : The New History of Celtic, Egyptian, Phoenician, Viking, Black African And Asian Contacts and Impacts in the Americas Before 1492 By Dr. Samuel D. Marble

by Jim Leslie,

Originally published in The Midwestern Epigraphic Journal

BEFORE COLUMBUS, by Dr. Samuel Marble, 1980, A.S. Barnes and Co., Inc., Cranbury, NJ 08512 and Thomas Yoseloff Ltd, Magdalen House, 136-148 Tooley Street, London SE1 2TT, England, ISBN 0-498-02370-2. The subtitle is “The New History of Celtic, Egyptian, Phoenician, Viking, Black African, and Asian Contacts and Impacts in the Americas before 1492”. Be sure to read my short bio of Dr. Marble at the end of this article.

A number of “Before Columbus” books have been written since the cultural ice-breaking books by Barry Fell and others in the sixties and seventies. Each surveyed the then known repositories of pre-Columbian evidence and added the evidence privy to the author, plus their opinion and insight on it all. Dr. Marble’s wonderful book is no less than these others but stands out with his extensive knowledge of Celtic and Christian influences in the new world, especially in the Incan society, and some little known but revealing details of the Columbus voyages and influences of the Egyptians and the Vikings.

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