Archive for Prince Henry Sinclair

The Isle of Frisland on Zeno Map (1380) is Real!

Hi Friends–

Regarding: the so-called “fantasy isle” of Frisland on the Zeno Map of 1380:

Prince Henry Sinclair’s legacy as a New World voyager, savior of 4,000 stranded Greenland farmers, and pirate-fighter has been held hostage by doctrinaire historians who have claimed that the Zeno Narrative and Map are “a Venetian-sponsored hoax.” Academic scholars, loyal to their antiquated Padigm, have insisted for eons that a prominent isle on the map, Frisland, “never existed” – except in the fictional musings of Nicolò Zeno (the Younger – a Venetian Senator) in the 16th century. He has been wrongly accused of inventing the “hoax” – although his reconstruction of events from memory did have some significant “lapses.” These difficulties were augmented with a little “literary license,” in places, that resulted in ultimately compromising the integrity of Gian Ramusio’s publication in Viaggi in 1558.

I noticed that three ancient maps (the Zeno 1380, Catalan 1480, and Prunes 1553) all had similar – but not identical – coastlines for Frisland. On the Catalan and Prunes Maps, the title is spelled Fixland – where the “x” was probably pronounced as “sh.” This would yield an English title of “Fish-land.”

Frisland is Real maps

Newfoundland was known as the principal isle of codfish from the 14th century up to modern times. The Portuguese and Basques called the Island bacalaos – which was the Portuguese-Basque word for “codfish.”

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Columbus: Late to the North American Party

http://westfordknight.blogspot.com

By David S. Brody

 

Little did I realize how a random 2006 conversation with my elementary-school daughter would change my life.

“Daddy, who discovered America?” she asked.

Suspecting she was learning about the Vikings in school, I played along. “Christopher Columbus,” I answered.

“Wrong!” she said. “It was Prince Henry Sinclair from Scotland. He came to Westford in 1399.”

We were living in Westford, Massachusetts at the time, a bedroom community 25 miles northwest of Boston and an equal distance from the Atlantic coastline to the east. Westford boasts the highest hill in eastern Massachusetts, and is not far from a major river (the Merrimack) leading to the Atlantic, so it was not unreasonable to assume ancient explorers would have found their way here. And, even as a child, I had wondered why Europeans stopped exploring North America in the years between the Norse explorations and Columbus. But a Scotsman by the name of Prince Henry Sinclair in Westford a century before Columbus? This I had not heard before.

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