Archive for Greek

East Africans & Ancient Navigation

EAST AFRICANS & ANCIENT NAVIGATION

 

by Harry Bourne

bsooty1@aol.com

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Why It Could Not Be

In a series of papers, this writer has proposed that our ancestors were very much more in touch by sea than is usually accepted by most maritime historians. Doubts about this lead us into something seen in many other of those other papers, namely opening with the negatives and this is echoed in this article with “Why it Could Not Be” are expressed. To also be borne in mind is that dates are to be expressed here as Before Common Era (= BCE/BC) and later ones as Common Era (= CE/AD), as are the international comparisons.

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What is going on here?

 

Originally published in Ancient American Magazine Issue #46

Wayne#4

Last Spring, a subscriber called our attention to this remarkable photograph. Although the original print was obtained by Mr. Wayne May, no information was associated with its purchase. All we may deduce from this intriguing image is that it appears to document an actual site, apparently sufficiently well known to have been visited by tourists in the late 19th century. Although the ladies and their clothes obviously belong to Western Civilization, their location could be anywhere. They might even have been wealthy European or American tourists in Polynesia, for all we know.

Wayne#2

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Caves And The Winter Solstice

Dear Editor,

I am Hezekiah Hensley and I have decided to write an article about a natural winter solstice alignment site I discovered.  It is a small cave located in the Red Bird River Valley in Eastern Clay County that aligns to the winter solstice.  I was at this cave back in the 1990’s with a small group of people and we witnessed the sun flood this cave from wall to wall and floor to ceiling on December 21st, the time of the winter solstice. This was at sunrise.  At this time I didn’t see a particular alignment.  I went back to the cave another year alone on December 22nd to further investigate the site.  I asked an archeologist named Robert Pyle of Morgantown, West Virginia if a day’s difference would change the alignment to the winter solstice and he said one or two day’s on either side of December 21st wouldn’t make any appreciable difference in the alignment.  When I was there on December 22nd I saw the exact alignment occur about nine or ten feet back in the cave.  It lined up with part of the cave wall that protrudes out from the wall and floor of the cave.  This part of the cave looks like a rounded boulder imbedded in the cave.  At sunrise on the winter solstice the sun’s rays shine into the cave and shine onto just the right edge of the rounded part of the cave wall creating the alignment.

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Early New World Maps

 Early New World Maps

by

Dr. Gunnar Thompson

 

Early Maps of the New World

The persistent academic argument concerning early voyages to the New World ends with an examination of the cartographic evidence. Maps that have been preserved in the collections of such distinguished archives as the Louvre (in Paris), the British Museum, and the Library of Congress are sufficient to prove that ancient seafarers as far back as the Roman Empire engaged in regular voyages to Ancient America.

The beauty of the ancient maps is that they contain precise details called “Diagnostic Geographical Markers.” These “markers” serve the same function as fingerprints found at a crime scene. These cartographical fingerprints contain unmistakable coastlines, geographical positions on the globe, references of longitude and latitude, proximities to identifiable mainland or islands, place names of cities or territorial titles (also called toponyms), and often text that identifies key features of topography, climate, vegetation, or native species of animals. Historical perspectives provided by the sequence of maps from a particular region are often sufficient to delineate sequential modifications of coastlines as subsequent explorers gradually improved the cartographical knowledge of a particular area.

The importance of examining the cartographical evidence is the realization that all the world’s maritime adventurers and merchants were actively engaged in exploring the world and taking advantage of valuable commodities from the earliest times that ships were capable of ocean sailing. Archaic academic notions that the New World was somehow isolated from Old World contact until after Columbus sailed across the Atlantic in an effort to reach China in the 15th century are based on a Eurocentric religious doctrine that was inherited from the Middle Ages. Most historians got their training at Medieval Church universities; and it was the belief of learned elders in these institutions that the sole purpose for having a Chronicle of the Ages (that is, “history”) was to document the spread of the “One True Religion” around the globe. Modern scholars would do well to abandon this myopic mental baggage, because the survival and prosperity of our species depends upon making an accurate appraisal of where we have come from in the past and where we need to be heading in the future. All the world’s peoples (and all religions) played a role in the past; and together we must build the pathway into the future. Read more